Home News Japanese Ambassador explains discharge of treated radioactive water as possible date nears

Japanese Ambassador explains discharge of treated radioactive water as possible date nears

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Japan Ambassador to Solomon Islands Miya Yoshiaki speaking to the press.
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Japan Ambassador to Solomon Islands Miya Yoshiaki has indicated that his country could discharge the treated radioactive water from the Fukushima nuclear plant in late October stressing that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has endorsed the discharges, as they are consistent with relevant international safety standards.

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Radiation impact on the environment

At home, the Solomon Islands remains concerned with the IAEA report in endorsing Japan’s plan to release treated radioactive water from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear plant accident into the Pacific Ocean.

The Solomon Islands Government said there is ongoing dialogue with Japan via the Pacific Islands Forum panel, through a Forum panel of scientists and experts to look at the science of Japan’s proposed discharge of the treated nuclear contaminated water.

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Speaking to journalists on Monday, Yoshiaki said they remain open to dialogue with all countries including Solomon Islands.

When asked about the likely time for the discharge, Yoshiaki said it could be end of October but his Prime Minister has yet to give the final date.

Referring to IAEA Report, which endorses the discharges, the ambassador pointed to two important issues. They are that the discharge is consistent with relevant international standards and the controlled, gradual discharges of the treated water to the seas, as currently planned, and assed would have a negligible radiological impact on people and the environment.

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A detailed explanation on transboundary impact

Furthermore, Yoshiaki underscored that they would monitor very closely once the discharge starts and measure the percentage of radioactive in the ocean’s water.

“If we find anything that indicates some danger to the environment, we will surely stop,” he said.

The ambassador emphasized that the monitoring would be done by IAEA.

Yoshiaki also confirmed that they would be sharing the information with all stakeholders including Solomon Islands.

He said the sea is important to Solomon Islands “and we have no intension to harm the environment including this region.”

News@SBMOnline2023

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